hard drive recognized by bios but not by windows

20
2014-04
  • Questioner

    I'm adding a new hard drive (A seagate ST31000340NS; I had links in here but I don't have enough reputation to post them. Interestingly, the bios recognizes it as a ST31000340AS, but it was bought as the other number...) to a friend's hp pavilion d4650e (mobo specs; google the model if you want the rest of the info, can't do more than one link.). Have had a hell of a time with it. Finally figured out that the hard drive needed a jumper set to limit the speed to 1.5gbps so the mobo would recognize it, and the bios DOES recognize it now. But not windows (using windows 7), using add new hardware or diskmgmt.msc. According to my friend, who was at the computer when it first booted after adding the jumper, a new hardware found dealio popped up saying something about raid, but I can't provide more info then that since I didn't see it.

    Ubuntu livecd recognized the drive before we changed the jumper. Haven't checked since then. XP didn't recognize it, that's the OS we started with. Upgraded to 7 hoping it might fix the problem.

    The only other info I can think of that might be immediately relevant is that the drive is plugged into the fifth sata channel, and the first channel is empty. Is this a problem? I assume not, because the two other drives (in a raid 0) and the cd and dvd drives are also on channels past the first one, and are recognized.

    Ask questions and I'll update with info!

  • Answers
  • 8088

    I'm adding a new hard drive, a Seagate ST31000340NS. Interestingly, the bios recognizes it as a ST31000340AS, but it was bought as the other number...

    If it were me, I would take the sucker out and check the label to make sure it matches what you bought. And if after you get past your current problems if the drive model is still reported as AS rather than NS I would check with Seagate about it.

    The ST31000340NS looks to be the enterprise version of the drive and I assume you paid a premium for it. Seagate may indeed sell exactly the same hardware and only change the labels and the warranty periods ... but you should at least get the label you (I assume) paid extra for. No?

    Finally figured out that the hard drive needed a jumper set to limit the speed to 1.5gbps so the mobo would recognize it, and the bios DOES recognize it now.

    This is supposed to be auto-negotiated ... oh, well. Suppose it doesn't make any difference since the board apparently doesn't support anything better than first generation SATA speeds.

    But not windows (using windows 7), using add new hardware or diskmgmt.msc.

    "Add new hardware" is not where I would be looking. I would look in the device manager (run the command devmgmt.msc in a command prompt). I expect you will find the drive listed there. My guess is that it is probably also showing up in diskmgmt.msc and just needs to be (1) initialized (assigned a MS serial number?) and (2) formatted. But WTHDIRK?

    Ubuntu livecd recognized the drive

    Which is why I expect Windows 7 will also recognize it. I seriously do not see how this could be a driver issue. Any drivers for the chipsets on this motherboard would already be included in Windows 7.

    You might have a problem with Windows XP if you used too early a version. Heck, the early versions of Windows XP did not even support a hard drive capacity larger than 128GB. XP was around a long time and went through some changes. But so long as you were using at least XP SP2 you should have been OK there as well.

    The only other info I can think of that might be immediately relevant is that the drive is plugged into the fifth sata channel, and the first channel is empty. Is this a problem?

    You lost me here. Below is an image of the motherboard from the link in your question. There are only four SATA ports on this board. Why are you talking about the "fifth sata channel"? There are only four SATA ports unless the motherboard reference you gave is wrong.

    Are you using the latest BIOS? If not I would get it from HP and upgrade. (It was dated Dec of 2007 IIRC).

    A8M2N-LA (NodusM3) motherboard

  • Sakamoto Kazuma

    The controller mode in the BIOS is set to AHCI? That certainly is an issue with XP and maybe with Windows 7 too, depending on the controller.


  • Related Question

    laptop - Working hard drive, but "Operating System Not Found". How to make visible to BIOS?
  • ngm

    I've recently been handed a 6 year old laptop (HP Pavilion ZD7000) that I want to repurpose for a family member to use. It was boxed and unused when it was given to me.

    However, upon boot, after the BIOS screen it is showing a black screen with a cursor, with the words "Operating System Not Found" occasionally flickering up.

    • I've run the XP installation disk and all appears to install successfully; but, upon boot, same problem -- operating system not found. Despite the fact that if I boot up from a Linux LiveCD I can mount the Windows partition and see that all of the Windows OS files are on there.

    • I've tried Linux and GRUB. I can format the whole drive, install Linux to disk, but still only get "Operating System Not Found" at boot. No GRUB, no nothing. But if I mount the drive from a LiveCD, all the OS files are visible.

    So the hard drive itself seems fine. It's entirely accessible and I can read/write on it once booted from a CD. I can only guess that there's some hardware problem stopping the hard drive being visible to the BIOS, or maybe a problem with the BIOS itself? It appears that it's just not visible to the BIOS.

    That's as far as my hardware/BIOS knowledge goes. Can anyone suggest what I might need to do to the hardware or to the BIOS in order to get it to see the drive?


  • Related Answers
  • DaveParillo

    One (or more) of three things probably going on here:

    1. The basic input/output system (BIOS) does not detect the hard disk.
    2. The hard disk is damaged.
    3. Sector 0 of the physical hard disk drive has an incorrect or malformed master boot record (MBR).

    You could try testing the disk, but it's probably easier to slap in a new drive & save yourself the trouble.

  • BBlake

    You might check the BIOS to see what the boot order is. If someone set it to only boot from CD or Network or might have set it to not boot from the hard disk. The other option I can think of is the hard drive boot sector is hosed.

  • Dave M

    Are there any diagnostics on the laptop. Some like the Lenovo and Dell have a minimal diagnostic in the BIOS and then a diagnostic partition on the drive ( not any help if drive is bad) On a Dell you press F12 and on an IBM/Lenovo there is a dedicated button.

    If there is a diagnostic, you can run that. Failing that, you can get a 2.5" to IDE adapter or 2.5 to USB at most computer shops and connect to a working desktop system and run a diagnostic on the drive. Some drive vendors like Western Digital and Seagate also have their own diagnostics. They only work with their drives I belive. I am sure there are lots of other tools for this but if you have a known good PC and attach the drive, you can eliminate all the laptop hardware in one test

  • CarlF

    Agreeing with other posters that the problem is likely in the drive hardware. If you have another laptop (and feel brave) you could swap the hard drives (if they're both IDE). If the non-booting box detects the drive from the other one, then you know the problem is in the Toshiba drive. If your other laptop detects the Toshiba drive, you know the problem is in the non-working system. (This is a case of the "binary swap" test.)

    Back up the known good drive before trying this!

  • Reynolds

    Sounds like there might not be any boot instructions. I'm not a Windows user, and I don't know what kind of bootloader system Windows uses, but I would try reinstalling the bootloader, or even installing GRUB which can boot Windows although that's not an ideal solution.

  • ralford

    You might be fighting an old worn-out cable. Old IDE cables can be flakey. Try disconnecting it from the motherboard and drive, and then plugging it back in again. This will sometimes improve the contact on the signal pins. If this doesn't work, try swapping out your IDE cable for a new one.

    How long is your IDE cable? I've seen IDE cables that are longer than what is "acceptable". Too long of an IDE cable can introduce signal integrity and timing issues.

  • Chris

    you might try deleting all the partitians on the drive, recreate and do a full format. If this doesn't work, it could be something with the IDE connector on the motherboard.

  • Karl

    If you have a Phoenix BIOS be sure to check on the Boot Order screen for the "!" character in front of a Boot Item. It signifies that it has been disabled from booting.