bios - Why Clonezilla doesn't recognize RAID0 drives - and how to fix it?

19
2014-04
  • Alex R

    I have a not-so-recent HP desktop PC (model# m9510f, Q8200 CPU - I think it was manufactured in early 2009 sometime, because it still had Vista 64-bit).

    I've set it up with a pair of 500GB drives that I want to run in RAID0 striped mode (for higher performance and lower reliability). I've successfully setup the RAID in the BIOS, and it is recognized at boot time.

    Only problem is, Clonezilla won't recognize the RAID0, so I can't very well restore the OS. I could just reinstall from the recovery disks, but then I suppose I also won't be able to make Clonezilla backups either. Clonezilla only sees the individual drives.

    What's the best way to get around this issue?

    Thanks

  • Answers
  • techie007

    Clonezilla doesn't support software-based or firmware-based (aka "FakeRAID") arrays.

    From what I understand your HP system has an Asus-made MB in it with an Intel ICH9R chipset. If you used that to make your RAID 0 then Clonezilla can't do anything with it.

    From their About page (under "Limitations"):

    Software RAID/fake RAID is not supported by default.

    From their FAQ:

    Q: Does Clonezilla support RAID ?

    A: Clonezilla does support hardware RAID, if your RAID device is seen as /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, /dev/hda, /dev/hdb, /dev/cciss/c0d0... on GNU/Linux. Clonezilla does support this. On the other hand, if it's Linux software RAID, no, Clonezilla does not support that.

    See here for a recent Clonezilla forum thread about using it (or rather, NOT using it) with firmware-based arrays.

    HTH

  • Multiverse IT

    Can't help you with Clonezilla as it appears from the previous poster that it simply will not work. If that's the case, use something else. Want free (as in no license fee)? Then you can use Microsoft's ImageX program. Image your old system with that to an external drive, then restore it. ImageX is a command line tool that is freely available within the Windows Automated Installation Kit. Using that kit, you can (if necessary) create a WinPE boot DVD that includes imagex and the drivers for your RAID controller. If windows can see the drive as you want it, you can deploy the image (note: if your Vista install (or whatever version of Windows you use) doesn't have the appropriate drivers for the RAID controller IN windows, then it may not boot at all - it would be wise to install the drivers BEFORE making the image). There could still be other issues - a possible need to make the drive partition "active"... but the imaging part of the problem should be solved with this solution.

  • Nathan Garabedian

    During my Google search for this problem, I saw a post that I thought was interesting, and worked for me when I tried it. (Caution: this only works for RAID 1 and possibly RAID 10).

    Unplug one of the drives. Then boot clonezilla. The RAID array will be "degraded". Then restore the image to the active drive, shutdown, plug the drive back in, and the array will rebuild. I'm currently watching a copy I just made this way and it seems to have worked great.

    The trick is that, since this is software RAID, the RAID info is stored on the drive. I only restored the partition, not the full drive, and I left the MBR as is (using the clonezilla advanced options). Make a comment if other options worked for you.

    Edit: I'm testing with a Dell Precision 390, with the Intel Matrix RAID built into the motherboard.


  • Related Question

    hard drive recognized by bios but not by windows
  • Questioner

    I'm adding a new hard drive (A seagate ST31000340NS; I had links in here but I don't have enough reputation to post them. Interestingly, the bios recognizes it as a ST31000340AS, but it was bought as the other number...) to a friend's hp pavilion d4650e (mobo specs; google the model if you want the rest of the info, can't do more than one link.). Have had a hell of a time with it. Finally figured out that the hard drive needed a jumper set to limit the speed to 1.5gbps so the mobo would recognize it, and the bios DOES recognize it now. But not windows (using windows 7), using add new hardware or diskmgmt.msc. According to my friend, who was at the computer when it first booted after adding the jumper, a new hardware found dealio popped up saying something about raid, but I can't provide more info then that since I didn't see it.

    Ubuntu livecd recognized the drive before we changed the jumper. Haven't checked since then. XP didn't recognize it, that's the OS we started with. Upgraded to 7 hoping it might fix the problem.

    The only other info I can think of that might be immediately relevant is that the drive is plugged into the fifth sata channel, and the first channel is empty. Is this a problem? I assume not, because the two other drives (in a raid 0) and the cd and dvd drives are also on channels past the first one, and are recognized.

    Ask questions and I'll update with info!


  • Related Answers
  • 8088

    I'm adding a new hard drive, a Seagate ST31000340NS. Interestingly, the bios recognizes it as a ST31000340AS, but it was bought as the other number...

    If it were me, I would take the sucker out and check the label to make sure it matches what you bought. And if after you get past your current problems if the drive model is still reported as AS rather than NS I would check with Seagate about it.

    The ST31000340NS looks to be the enterprise version of the drive and I assume you paid a premium for it. Seagate may indeed sell exactly the same hardware and only change the labels and the warranty periods ... but you should at least get the label you (I assume) paid extra for. No?

    Finally figured out that the hard drive needed a jumper set to limit the speed to 1.5gbps so the mobo would recognize it, and the bios DOES recognize it now.

    This is supposed to be auto-negotiated ... oh, well. Suppose it doesn't make any difference since the board apparently doesn't support anything better than first generation SATA speeds.

    But not windows (using windows 7), using add new hardware or diskmgmt.msc.

    "Add new hardware" is not where I would be looking. I would look in the device manager (run the command devmgmt.msc in a command prompt). I expect you will find the drive listed there. My guess is that it is probably also showing up in diskmgmt.msc and just needs to be (1) initialized (assigned a MS serial number?) and (2) formatted. But WTHDIRK?

    Ubuntu livecd recognized the drive

    Which is why I expect Windows 7 will also recognize it. I seriously do not see how this could be a driver issue. Any drivers for the chipsets on this motherboard would already be included in Windows 7.

    You might have a problem with Windows XP if you used too early a version. Heck, the early versions of Windows XP did not even support a hard drive capacity larger than 128GB. XP was around a long time and went through some changes. But so long as you were using at least XP SP2 you should have been OK there as well.

    The only other info I can think of that might be immediately relevant is that the drive is plugged into the fifth sata channel, and the first channel is empty. Is this a problem?

    You lost me here. Below is an image of the motherboard from the link in your question. There are only four SATA ports on this board. Why are you talking about the "fifth sata channel"? There are only four SATA ports unless the motherboard reference you gave is wrong.

    Are you using the latest BIOS? If not I would get it from HP and upgrade. (It was dated Dec of 2007 IIRC).

    A8M2N-LA (NodusM3) motherboard

  • Sakamoto Kazuma

    The controller mode in the BIOS is set to AHCI? That certainly is an issue with XP and maybe with Windows 7 too, depending on the controller.